How to Make Wildcat Cartridges

WIldcat ammo includes all shapes and sizes

What is a Wildcat?

Wildcat ammo, AKA “wildcats,” are custom-made rounds. People create the rounds rather than ammo companies. People make wildcat cartridges to improve upon existing rounds to get better accuracy, range, performance, velocity, etc. The downside  is the lack of precision. Law enforcement and military can’t use the rounds because of the differences.

Creating Wildcats

Creating a new type of ammunition can be  fun. Patience, time and skill to make a good round are key. Makers of wildcat rounds want to create something new or to change a load that doesn’t meet their needs. Below are the reasons for creating a wildcat:

  • Increased efficiency: Increased efficiency means better accuracy.
  • Increased energy: The round increases energy by changing the capacity of the case or changing the caliber.
  • Higher velocities: A higher velocity is a result of reducing the caliber or increasing the case capacity .
  • Greater consistency: Changing the diameter, weight or velocity will increase consistency and accuracy.

Methods

Methods used to make wildcat rounds include:

Fire Forming

Fire forming changes bullets in one of two ways. The method changes the parent case by cold forming. Then it is loaded with a light bullet and light powder, and then loaded and fired from the gun of choice.

Cold Forming

Cold forming changes the case by using heavy lubrication and then carefully forcing it into the right reloading die.

Trimming

Both fire forming and cold forming  have the same problem: The case is too long for the end product so it has to be trimmed to the correct length. Trimming is a standard reloading method.

Changing the Case Diameter

Changing the case diameter expands the range of bullets that can be used in the case. Shooters refer to it as “necking up” or “necking down,” Changing the diameter can improve the wind resistance, power and/or velocity.

Necking Back

This uses a cold forming method to push the neck back, reducing the case capacity. Cold forming is used on rifle ammunition to make rounds for an autopistol.

Changing the Shoulder Angle

This means changing the casing to resemble a standard cylinder, which allows for a more efficient burn.

Rim Modifications

Experts avoid making rim modifications by hand. The process is difficult.  It is a highly difficult method usually performed by commercial ammo manufacturers.

Increased Case Length

Increased case length allows for added propellant. As a result, the round gains energy. The process is difficult, therefore it is simpler to make a new case than to change a commercial round. It requires special skills and tools.

Blowing Out

Blowing out uses a fire-forming technique. It moves the shoulder forward to raise the case capacity.

Should You Make a Wildcat?

We may not need new cartridges, but we still want them. The advantages they offer aren’t great; the gain rarely justifies the expense.  If you plan to make wildcat rounds, educate yourself. Makers should have skills for the dangerous process. Manufacturing rounds also needs enough space, special tools and equipment for each process.

Pros and Cons of the .40 Cal S&W

Pistols chambered in .40 cal S&W

The .40 Cal S&W is a rimless pistol ammunition created for the Federal Bureau of Investigation by firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester. The .40 S&W (10x22mm) was developed from scratch after the failed FBI shootout in Miami in 1986. The confrontation left two FBI agents dead, with five wounded. The agents fatally wounded the two criminals.

The FBI commissioned Smith & Wesson and Winchester to create an ammo that could be retrofitted into their existing 9mm semi-automatic handguns. S&W and Winchester based the new ammunition on 9mm and .45 ACP cartridges. The new cartridge would function as a medium velocity round mimicking the accuracy of a 9mm, but using the parameters of a 10mm load.

The team satisfied FBI requirements. The new medium ground ammo could be used by agents in a standard issue semi-automatic pistol. The FBI believed that the new standard issue would prevent another disaster like the one they faced in Miami.

Development of the .40 S&W

The FBI determined that the standard issue .38 Special revolvers had lost their effectiveness. They switched to 10mm cartridge and the S&W 1076 Auto shortly before the Miami shootout. The FBI determined the agents’ deaths were caused by lack of ammunition, heavy recoil, and the difficulty of reloading quickly in the field. It was imperative to find a new, more effective ammo to prevent future debacles.

S&W and Winchester completed the development of .40 Cal bullets in 1990, along with the Smith & Wesson Model 4006 pistol, six months after receiving the request from the FBI. The result of the collaboration was an ammunition with the stopping power of a .45 ACP round, with the ease of use of a 9mm.

The FBI adopted the .40 Cal S&W. Law enforcement agencies around the country quickly followed suit. The United States Coast Guard and police forces in Canada and Australia also adopted the .40 S&W and still use it today.

The FBI currently endorses the Sig Sauer P226 and P228, chambered in 9mm and .40 cal.

Specs

The .40 Cal S&W uses a 0.40-inch diameter lead bullet ranging in weight from 105 to 200 grains.

The middle ground ammunition has adequate stopping power for self-defense and concealed carry. The recoil is manageable for novice and shooters with a smaller frame.

The .40 S&W casing measures .85-inch-long, .424-inch at the base. It has an average pressure of 35,000 psi. The energy of the ammo exceeds the standard-pressure of the .45 ACP.

Based on ideal terminal ballistic performance testing in the 1980s and 1990s, the .40 S&W was touted as “the ideal cartridge for personal defense and law enforcement”. The .40 Cal S&W is almost identical to the ballistics of the .38-40 Winchester introduced in 1874, with the same bullet diameter and weight, as well as having similar muzzle velocities.

Alternate Names

  • .40 Caliber
  • .40 Cal
  • .40 Auto
  • 10×22mm
  • 10mm Kurz

The .40 Cal S&W for Self-Defense

The .40 S&W is attractive to civilians due to its ease of use and light recoil. People seeking ammo for self-defense situations demand accuracy and stopping power. The .40 cal meets those requirements. Consumers have a variety of options for bullet weight and design.

Civilians appreciate the same features coveted by law enforcement, including magazine capacity, muzzle energy, and light recoil. The round is accurate and easy to manage, making it ideal for concealed carry and self-defense. While it isn’t the most popular round on the market, most new firearms offer compact and subcompact models chambered for the .40 Cal.

 

Sports Shooting For Kids

Youth Sport Shooting Competition

You think your kid may be a natural in the sports shooting arena, and you want to get him involved. Sports shooting can teach kids several skills including responsibility, independent learning, handling peer pressure, and functioning in stressful situations. However, there are some things to consider before you get started. Consider the child’s age, interest, and ability to focus.

Age

There are differing opinions on the age when a child should be introduced to guns. Some organizations will start at age 8 while others suggest ages 10 and above. For the most part, it depends upon the child’s interest and maturity level. Children at younger ages tend to start off with simple weapons like BB guns and air rifles. As the child ages, the weapons become bigger and more lethal.

Interest

One parent stated that you should wait until the child expresses interest in guns before heading out to the range. If a child is not interested in shooting, then pushing the issue is not going to have a great result. Consider the reason for wanting to teach the kid to shoot. Is it because he is interested or simply because you want a plinking buddy or future Olympian? No matter what the reason, start off easy and gauge if it’s a sport that interests your child.

Ability To Focus

The ability to focus is the most important aspect when it comes to being educated about guns. A child should never be given a gun without knowing the basics and being versed in safety. Keep the instructions short and to the point, but reinforce it often. If the child only wants to play and refuses to listen to the rules, then forging ahead can lead to disaster. Table the activity or choose another sport that is less dangerous.

Lessons Learned

There are many lessons that can be learned from sports shooting. Many can be transferred to other areas of a child’s life. The best part is that the child will probably not realize he’s in a school of a different kind.

Learning To Fail

Learning to fail may be one of the best skills we can teach our children. While no one wants to fail, it creates great opportunity for growth. A child that never learns to fail won’t be able to handle it when things don’t go his or her way. In sports, success and failure are instantaneous. If you hit a target, you’ll know it. If you miss, that too is obvious. It gives the child the chance to use critical thinking to correct what went wrong and fix it. Success after a failure is more powerful than hitting the target on the first try.

Competition

Sports shooting is highly competitive and can teach the child how to challenge himself. In competition kids are often pitted against adults. This may seem unfair but it’s one of life’s best lessons. It creates persistence and tenacity. Additionally, children will be exposed to every type of competitor, from the newest of the new to old timers that have been competing before their parents were born. It teaches children how to relate to people in other age groups, learn from experience, and perhaps gain a mentor.

Quality Time

Shooting sports are not age or gender specific. Unlike Hannah’s soccer game or Bobby’s wrestling match, shooting is a sport that everyone can participate in at the same time. The entire family can have a great day plinking or attending a competition. If one or more members of a family compete, the family may have the opportunity to travel across the country. It’s a bonding experience that will last a lifetime.

Education

Ray LeBlond said, “You learn something every day if you pay attention.” What can shooting sports teach children? Critical thinking, time management, math, and physics, for starters. Children who participate in sports show much higher levels of success in math and science than children who do not.

Choosing a Sports Shooting Rifle

Introducing Shooting

 The Gun

After educating your child on the basics and safety procedures involved in shooting, the next step would be to find an appropriate gun. Until you gauge your child’s interest in sports shooting, using a gun already on hand is the smartest and most economical way to go. When choosing a gun, make sure it’s one that the child can handle safely. If a child is injured on his first day out, chances are that’s the end of it.

When choosing a gun, consider if the child is best suited to using a rifle or a handgun. Also, consider the ammo needed and the amount of recoil. 

Fun Targets

Shooting should be fun, especially for kids. To keep it light, pick out some fun targets. There are paper targets on the market that incorporate several games to keep the child’s interest. Family members can compete against each other in a lighthearted way. It builds the child’s confidence and skill level without adding pressure. You might also want to choose tin cans or steel targets that create a noise when hit. Moving forward, you may want to incorporate skeet shooting. Every kid likes to see things explode.

Keep it Simple

Remember that teaching shooting should be easy and fun. Approaching a lesson like an Olympic trial isn’t going to make the kid want to continue. Always keep safety measures in mind, but create games to engage the child. If the child makes a mistake, point out what he did right and help him to correct his mistakes in a gentle way. Pushing too hard will cause a child to lose interest.

Bring a Friend

Kids like to be around other kids. If your child has a friend who would like to tag along, encourage it. Maybe that friend has a parent or sibling that also enjoys shooting. Creating a fun day out will only encourage your child to continue, and by continuing, to improve.

The History Of Sport Shooting

 

Sport shooting has changed a great deal since its inception as technology has advanced. Along with those advancements came new sports and competitions, many of which culminate at the Olympic Games. As of 2017, 9.38 million Americans aged six years and older participate in some form of sports shooting activity. But where did it all begin?

The Beginning

As you may have guessed, early sports shooting revolved around rifles. The first recorded competition, most likely using matchlocks, was in 1477 in Eichstäat, Bavaria. In it competitors shot at targets at a 200 meters (200 yards) distance.

A 1504 painting depicts a Swiss shooting set up that appears modern. Competitors fired at targets from enclosed shooting booths. Target markers measured their shots and reported each value to the judges.

European Sport Shooting

The 16th century saw leaps and bounds in the European sports shooting arena. Germany appears to have had an unusual purpose for target shooting. Many museums display wooden targets that were crafted as part of wedding celebrations. Guests would shoot at the targets. At the end of the event, they gave the riddled targets as gifts to the bride and groom.

Russia officially joined the target shooting world in 1737, when Empress Anna opened a target shooting range at the royal court. Competitors shot at live birds and the best of the best received gold and diamond studded cups. The sport caught on and in 1806, Russian military officers founded the Society of Shooting Amateurs, a group whose interests lay in handguns.  Societies began to blossom in St. Petersburg including the Riga Shooting Society and the St. Petersburg Society of Salon Shooting. The first official set of rifle competition rules were established in 1897 by the Imperial Society of Reglemented Hunting.

By the mid-19th century, sport shooting had a strong foothold on both sides of the pond. European countries had begun having fierce competitions on a regular basis. England was so devoted to the study and development of arms that the National Rifle Association was formed in 1860. Queen Victoria fired the inaugural shot at the first meeting of the association.

Sport Shooting in America

The mid-18th century also saw target shooting thrive in the New World. Everyone from colonists to frontiersmen participated in the sport. Every settlement had some form of shooting match with as many as a hundred marksmen in attendance.

By 1830, shooting became organized with clubs dotting the map. The National Rifle Club, a benchmark society, was formed in 1850. The Civil War had a hand in propelling sport shooting to the forefront when National Guard Officers formed the National Rifle Association in 1871 to improve military marksmanship and safety.

In 1896, the cultures came together when sport shooting was added to the Olympic Games.  Five events featured the sport. As technology grew, so did the number and variety of events during the Games. Currently, there are fifteen events for men and women, utilizing rifles, shotguns, and pistols.

5 Reasons to Practice Dry Firing, Even When You Don’t Think It Makes a Difference

Mention dry firing your gun in a room full of shooters and you’ll soon discover they quickly divide into two groups. One that doesn’t believe dry firing  does anything other than improve your draw, and by very little at that. And the other that swears dry fire practice can fix every shooting mistake from trigger control to eye dominance.

Regardless of your position, there’s no reason not to include some level of dry firing into your firearm practice. As long as your gun was made sometime within the last five decades or so and you’re not shooting a .22, dry firing doesn’t hurt your gun. Let’s repeat that, as long as you have a centerfire gun that was made in the modern world, you’re safe to practice dry fire.

Even if you think dry firing won’t improve your aim at all, it’s still worth  practicing. Here are five reasons why.

1. The more you practice, the better your skill

Shooting, like most things in life, is a skill. And to make any skill better, you must practice it. Therefore, the more you practice shooting, the better  you become. And while many objectors may want to pipe in here and say that dry firing isn’t shooting, which is true, there are other skills involved. Things like trigger control. Aim. Follow through. And these things do, in fact, get better with dry fire practice.

2. Dry firing can happen just about anywhere

One of the biggest benefits of dry firing is that you can do it anywhere. In your backyard. Your kitchen. A hotel room. You can do it places you normally couldn’t shoot and you don’t have to worry about the noise bothering your neighbors or making the dogs howls. Since you can do it anywhere, practice often. Even 10-15 minutes of practice 3-4 days a week shows up at the range after just a few sessions.

3. Recoil doesn’t hide your errors

When you live fire a gun, there’s always a recoil, and if you make a mistake, it becomes easy to blame it on the boom. But when you dry fire, there is no recoil to hide behind. This allows you to really examine your shot and see where mistakes arise. Where’s your finger on the trigger? Is your grip too lose?

4. Dry firing lets you fix them

Once the recoil disappears and you discover where your mistakes occur, dry firing allows you to fix them. Dry fire practice can help you correct your grip, reduce recoil anticipation, and turn your draw into muscle  memory, without costing you a fortune on the range while you hone in the skill.

5. It’s inexpensive

Speaking of costing  a fortune, which is what shooting regularly at the range does, dry firing is an inexpensive way to practice handling your firearm. After the initial low cost of purchasing snap caps (fake bullets that allow your firearm to act as though it’s loaded), dry firing is free. Compare that to the cost of a 100 rounds of .45s for your 1911 and suddenly dry firing seems like the economic alternative.

There’s nothing that can compare to live firing your gun, which should be done on a regular basis to both improve and maintain your skill.  But dry firing does have it’s benefits, even if it doesn’t fix the world.

3 Skeet Shooting Tips for Beginners

If you’re considering skeet shooting, be prepared. This American sport is fun and addictive. But if it’s the first time you’ve been to an event, it can feel overwhelming. That’s why, here at Bigger Better Shooting, we’re giving you three skeet shooting tips for beginners. That way you know exactly what you need to do when it’s your turn to pull, aim, and fire.

3 Skeet Shooting Tips for Beginners

1. Keep both eyes open.

Shooting a shotgun is a whole lot different than shooting a rifle or 1911 handgun. With no real sights and only a dot to use, you don’t pull your gun and carefully aim like you would with a Ruger 10/22. Instead you simply pull and shoot when the target, in this case a clay pigeon, comes into  view.

And remember to keep both eyes open. With a moving target, using both eyes improves your depth perception and makes a solid hit more likely.

2. Stay relaxed.

When shooting skeet, stay relaxed in your stance, throughout your swing, and in your follow through. Once you tighten up, your movements become forced and jagged, making you more likely to stiffen and miss your target.

While many skeet shooters like to have their shotgun pulled to their shoulder before the pigeon is released, if you ever want to go an international competition, start practicing with your gun’s buttstock at mid-torso. This is the requirement for Olympic skeet shooting and other international events.

3. Watch and learn.

Your last skeet shooting tip: watch and learn, especially at an event with seasoned shooters. See how they move, how they grip their shotgun, and what happens after they shoot. Also watch the clay pigeons and observe how they rise and drop, if there’s movement to their angles, and what kind of speed their traveling at.

With as little as 20 minutes of simple observation, you can and will shoot better and with more accuracy.

Air Rifles With Break Barrels—the Perfect Way to Shoot!

Guns come in various shapes and sizes–which include rifles, handguns, shotguns and revolvers. Each gun has a specific use and is used by individuals on the basis of their immediate requirements. Air rifles with break barrels are one of the most popular categories of guns available on the racks today. If you are a little lost, then read on for insight into their features.

Break Barrels—a Closer Look

Air rifles are weapons that typically use compressed air or gas for propelling projectiles like pellets, other kind of ammunition or even arrows. Most of them have a spring coil mechanism. Certain spring piston guns have cocking levers which compress their spring with the help of a lever that is present on the underside or side of the rifle. Some use a coiled spring power plant to compress and have an air chamber.

Break Barrel Air Rifles

Break barrels have their unique design and functionality. To cock the gun, one has to break the barrel, which means you need to swing it on a hinge. This compresses the spring and makes it ready to fire. After this, the shooter needs to load the pellet, break the barrel up– which effectively refers to the step of putting the rifle back in position, and he/she is ready to use his gun. These types of air rifles are among the most commonly available ones in the market and are affordable too. They usually come equipped with power ranging from 600 FPA (feet per second) to 1500 FPS.

Their break mechanism is quite different from that of other air rifles. A pivot bearing (of a large diameter) acts as the barrel and is large enough to spread the load when the gun is cocked. The constant breaking of the barrel seldom worries users about its misalignment or a drop in accuracy levels. This rifle is well designed to support constant breaking. Break barrels hold fewer rounds than other rifles. They come in a variety of calibres, with .177 and .22 being the most common. The former has a greater level of accuracy and range but the latter can be used to shoot animals of any size. They are mostly used for hunting small birds, animals or for pest control purposes.

The Perfect Shot

Constant breaking of these rifles can be a little tricky if you are using them for the first time, but once you get a hang of it, it gets easier and faster to use. It is small, light and accurate. Before you go ahead with your trysts, ensure that you invest in S&B ammo or other products that best suit your need.

All the best.

The Art of Shooting

The art of shooting  is an extremely demanding exercise. It demands great concentration, skill and precision to deliver the perfect shot under enormous pressure. A winning performance depends on a number of different aspects. Things like  wind condition, lighting, equipment or just the way you feel that morning can affect your performance.

Any good shooter will tell you that to maximize the chances of success in this sport; you have to minimize the variables. Knowing exactly how your gun and ammo will respond when you pull the trigger is just one of these aspects.

The Gun

Very few professionals will change their gun manufacturers through a tournament. In fact, they will stick to one gun for training and the actual event itself. This is because even the same make of the gun made by the same manufacturer will behave a little differently.

This minute difference is all that separates the winners to the also-rans.

Depending on the shooting event the guns vary. Some of the top manufacturers of guns for professional shooters are Beretta, Dan Wesson, Remington. There are a number of other top quality gun manufacturers as well. However, their popularity among the pro athletes is much lesser.

Role of Ammunition

The gun and the ammunition inside have to be of top notch quality to provide the best performance to the shooter. There are many considerations to be taken in mind when judging ammunition like ballistic co-efficient, premium propellant powder as well as bullet design and cartridge quality.

A top notch shooter will be well versed with the physics of projectile motion, wind drag and aerodynamics to really understand the sport and its equipment performance.

Of course cost is also an issue here as the art of shooting requires a large amount of ammunition to be shot. Not an issue if the sports federation is paying for it, however if you are an independent performer, then it can quickly start burning a hole in your pocket.

A lot of shooters prefer to use quality product from a big name manufacturer, Hornady ammo in particular is extremely popular on the professional circuit.

The Mind

Olympic medal winners often speak of how getting their mental focus right for the sport was their biggest challenge. The athletes need to make a cocoon for themselves isolating themselves from the intense pressure and go into the zone at will. This is a task that often proves to be much more difficult than perfecting the physical skill of shooting.

These three form the areas over which the shooter must have complete mastery and control to reach the summit of their sport. Once there, everything but the target disappears.

How to Better Practice Your Shooting Skills

When shooting, it can be tough to really see success to be good at your gun if you don’t really know exactly what you are doing. There are several different ways to help enhance your shooting and gun skills, but you need to do the right things so you can shoot effectively when you need to. Whether you decide to get into shooting as a sport or you would like to use it for self defense, you really need to consider these really helpful tips.

How To Better Practice Your Shooting Skills

Shooting Ranges

Head down to the shooting range and utilize the practice sheets for shooting. A great tip is to focus an entire shooting session using the gun that you have to hit only one spot only. If you can focus your mind and arms hitting just one specific part, you’ll definitely succeed. The shooting range oftentimes has multiple moving practice areas that will make you have to shoot something while it is moving. If you can practice this, you will surely succeed in the long run.

Using the Right Gun

It is vital that you use the right gun. There are so many different guns on the market that can be good for you, but some of them may really not be worth using specifically for your skills. Different people have different skill sets, and you should know that the right gun for your skills is super important. Look for a gun that fits into your budget and also isn’t too complicated for you. The last thing you want to do is to end up getting the right gun so you can use it more effectively.

Getting Good Ammo

You need to consider using something like Tula Ammo. Getting a good amount of Ammo from a professional Ammo gun company will allow for you to succeed in the long run. Ammo.net has a lot of great ammo and deals you can grab today.

Shooting is a difficult thing to do. A lot of practice and properly using the right gun all come together to help you protect yourself and get into it as a sport. If you are going to succeed in this industry, you need to head down to a shooting range so that you can always get better. Practicing your skills in a safe environment is really important in order to strengthen your skills and shoot effectively.

The Benefits of Participating in Shooting Sports

Shooting sports have become very popular in recent years especially for people that do not fear handling guns. You can always improve your shooting skills by working with a certified instructor. The sports ensure that participants get optimal experience because they offer various types of weaponry. Shooting is good for both the mind and the body and this article will highlight some of the many benefits that are associated with this unique sport.

It Is a Safe Sport

Other sporting activities like biking, swimming and football are in fact more dangerous than shooting sports despite the fact that guns are very dangerous instruments. Guns are very safe especially when used in the right way and only few cases f injury are normally reported compared to other sports like riding in a car and swimming. The fact that a gun is a very deadly weapon does not mean that shooting games are equally dangerous. The number of injuries associated with shooting sports has significantly declined because of the growing number of safety training programs.

It Is a Fun Sport

It is just plan fun when you choose shooting as a sport. Some of the most interesting activities include cowboy action shooting, target shooting and outside plinking of cans. It is difficult fully describe the fun associated with shooting sports and the only way to prove this is by personally experiencing the thrill. Shooting sports are also very effective when it comes to relieving stress.

It Is a Family Sport

The other good thing about shooting sports is that fact that they can be played by all family members regardless of their sex and age. You can actually make great family memories by participating in the sport together. You can always have fun with your wife, children and even grandchildren.

It Is a Good Individual Sport

There are some people that like doing things on their own and it is good to know that you can shoot by yourself without the help of an instructor. You can always enjoy your moments of solitude as you think about life. Having your own space also enables you to grow in your marksmanship.

It Builds Physical Discipline

There are quite a number of physical disciplines that can acquired through shooting sports. Some of them include fine motor skills, hand-eye coordination, stamina ad increased strength. The acquired skills can be applied in other areas of life. Handguns and 12 gauge ammo are in most cases used in shooting sports.