3 Skeet Shooting Tips for Beginners

If you’re considering skeet shooting, be prepared. This American sport is fun and addictive. But if it’s the first time you’ve been to an event, it can feel overwhelming. That’s why, here at Bigger Better Shooting, we’re giving you three skeet shooting tips for beginners. That way you know exactly what you need to do when it’s your turn to pull, aim, and fire.

3 Skeet Shooting Tips for Beginners

1. Keep both eyes open.

Shooting a shotgun is a whole lot different than shooting a rifle or 1911 handgun. With no real sights and only a dot to use, you don’t pull your gun and carefully aim like you would with a Ruger 10/22. Instead you simply pull and shoot when the target, in this case a clay pigeon, comes into  view.

And remember to keep both eyes open. With a moving target, using both eyes improves your depth perception and makes a solid hit more likely.

2. Stay relaxed.

When shooting skeet, stay relaxed in your stance, throughout your swing, and in your follow through. Once you tighten up, your movements become forced and jagged, making you more likely to stiffen and miss your target.

While many skeet shooters like to have their shotgun pulled to their shoulder before the pigeon is released, if you ever want to go an international competition, start practicing with your gun’s buttstock at mid-torso. This is the requirement for Olympic skeet shooting and other international events.

3. Watch and learn.

Your last skeet shooting tip: watch and learn, especially at an event with seasoned shooters. See how they move, how they grip their shotgun, and what happens after they shoot. Also watch the clay pigeons and observe how they rise and drop, if there’s movement to their angles, and what kind of speed their travelling at.

With as little as 20 minutes of simple observation, you can and will shoot better and with more accuracy.

3 Shooting Skills to Improve Before Your Next Competition

When it comes to competition shooting, everyone has an opinion on how to improve your shot. And, sure, seeking professional training and buying a better gun can definitely make you more competitive. But when you want better aim and consistency, there are three shooting skills you should constantly strive to improve:

  • Grip
  • Trigger contact
  • Follow through

Grip

Grip is one of those things that gun enthusiasts talk about, but many don’t treat like a shooting skill. They seem to think that once the “know” how their grip should be, it just happens.

But it doesn’t.

Too many shooters use inconsistent grips, changing how they hold their gun every time they step up to shoot. This doesn’t allow you to build muscle memory or consistency.

To improve shooting skills, strive to grip your gun the same way every time you hold it. Grip high. First with your dominant hand, then with your support hand. And keep both thumbs pointing forward.

Focus on keeping your grip firm and consistent during  shooting drills and remember your grip shouldn’t change before, during, or after firing.

Trigger Contact

Trigger contact is another shooting skill that can make or break your competition game. You want the same part of your finger — your fingerprint — to touch the trigger every time you pull it.

Consistent trigger contact keeps your firing smooth and your aim accurate. When your finger is too far over the trigger and it makes contact with the bend of your knuckle, you’re likely to pull the gun and hit right of your target.

If it’s your fingertip on the trigger, you may push the trigger to the side instead of pulling it straight back, causing you to hit left of your intended aim.

Follow Through

Sure, most shooters understand the importance of follow through when you’re bird hunting, but it’s just as important in competition shoots. Once your target’s in sight and you pull the trigger, you must control your firearm to perfect your shooting skills.

Any shaking, flinching, or moving, whether it’s in anticipation of the shot or in response to the recoil, impacts your aim and takes it longer for you to prepare for your second shot. Both of these things are important in sports shooting, but they’re also vitally important in self defense shooting.

Choosing the Right Handgun for Competition Shooting

Many individuals choosing handguns for the first time have no idea what to look for and often buy a weapon simply to keep it in their safe or vehicles for protection. Apart from learning to shoot many want more out of their gun. For example, taking up competitive shooting as hobby or sport. Some factors should be taken into consideration prior to purchasing the gun. Do you know what type of competitions you would like to compete in? The action type a well as holster availability? These are some of the important questions to ask yourself.

Where to Start

In general you can get started in almost any game with a 9 mm in auto or a .38 special with most competitions allowing 9 mm ammo. Some of the popular pistols include a Springfield XDm or a Glock 17. Competitive shooting usually has limits on the rounds your pistol are allowed. This should not be a deciding factor however as you can load the magazine to lower capacity.

Choosing Your Pistol

When choosing handguns make sure magazines are available as you would require at least two additional magazines for some competitions. You should always consider the possibility of a magazine malfunctioning during a crucial stage. The additional magazines allow for more flexibility when planning reloads during games.

Internal or manual safety is a matter of personal choice and opinion. Many prefer internal whereas others prefer manual thumb safety. However, as far as recommendation goes internal does seem like the better option. You don’t waste time by getting the gun out of its holster and fumble with a safety.

Semi-Automatic Handguns

Semi-automatic handguns with removable magazines are the ideal options especially for beginners as oppose to revolvers. They offer more versatility and are easier to fire, load and clean as well. durability is another factor to consider when you think of the thousands of rounds you will be shooting with the firearm without major issues.

Final Thoughts on Choosing Handguns

It is also important that the gun is approved and legal in IDPA and USPSA classes depending on which types of competitions you wish to enter. It is import to realize that not everybody is capable of shooting and shooting well with a handgun. Therefor do not go out and buy the full gear before you accessed yourself as mentally and visually capable of shooting.

You do not wish to experience a diminished rate of return therefore opt for a full sized handgun with the barrel only four to five inches in length. Although there are more considerations take into regard that you are the one who are actually going to use the gun, therefor make sure it feels right for you and suit you personally.